Sightings List

Okay, this will be the last post about our recent, most excellent birding trip to the New River Birding and Nature Festival. We were about 100 birders from all parts of the country and Canada. We split into various smaller groups every day and birded at different habitats along the New River Gorge in West Virginia. As a group, over the course of the 4 days, we saw 148 different species, which is pretty damn good. Gail and I personally saw 60 species, including quite a few Central and South American migrants on their way to their northern breeding grounds. Here’s our list. (This is so interesting you might need a cup of coffee to stay awake! LOL)

Red-winged Blackbird           NEWRVR   5/6/11 11:34 AM    38.06510 -81.07757

Eastern Bluebird               NEWRVR   5/6/11 1:18 PM     38.06510 -81.07757

Indigo Bunting                 OPCRK    5/5/11 10:06 AM    38.09166 -81.06357

Northern Cardinal              OPCRK    5/5/11 8:53 AM     38.09166 -81.06357

Gray Catbird                   NEWRVR   5/6/11 2:31 PM     38.06510 -81.07757

Carolina Chickadee             NEWRVR   5/6/11 1:18 PM     38.06510 -81.07757

American Coot                  NEWRVR   5/6/11 12:52 PM    38.06510 -81.07757

Brown-headed Cowbird           OPCRK    5/5/11 8:29 AM     38.09166 -81.06357

American Crow                  NEWRVR   5/5/11 5:22 PM     38.06510 -81.07757

Black-billed Cuckoo            OPCRK    5/5/11 9:26 AM     38.09166 -81.06357

Wood Duck                      NEWRVR   5/6/11 3:21 PM     38.06510 -81.07757

Acadian Flycatcher             SGRCRK   5/7/11 11:05 AM    38.15658 -81.08332

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher      SGRCRK   5/7/11 7:39 AM     38.15658 -81.08332

American Goldfinch             NEWRVR   5/5/11 5:24 PM     38.06510 -81.07757

Canada Goose                   SGRCRK   5/7/11 12:15 PM    38.15658 -81.08332

Rose-breasted Grosbeak         SGRCRK   5/7/11 9:41 AM     38.15658 -81.08332

Common Grackle                 OPCRK    5/5/11 12:34 PM    38.09166 -81.06357

Red-tailed Hawk                NEWRVR   5/6/11 9:20 AM     38.06510 -81.07757

Sharp-shinned Hawk             OPCRK    5/5/11 11:24 AM    38.09166 -81.06357

Ruby-throated Hummingbird      OPCRK    5/5/11 10:55 AM    38.09166 -81.06357

Blue Jay                       OPCRK    5/5/11 8:52 AM     38.09166 -81.06357

Common Merganser               NEWRVR   5/6/11 11:33 AM    38.06510 -81.07757

Northern Mockingbird           RNDM     5/8/11 12:04 PM    360.00000 360.00000

Baltimore Oriole               NEWRVR   5/6/11 9:20 AM     38.06510 -81.07757

Orchard Oriole                 NEWRVR   5/6/11 1:18 PM     38.06510 -81.07757

Ovenbird                       OPCRK    5/5/11 7:03 AM     38.09166 -81.06357

Northern Parula                SGRCRK   5/7/11 11:16 AM    38.15658 -81.08332

Eastern Phoebe                 OPCRK    5/5/11 10:14 AM    38.09166 -81.06357

Common Raven                   SGRCRK   5/7/11 12:37 PM    38.15658 -81.08332

American Redstart              SGRCRK   5/7/11 7:57 AM     38.15658 -81.08332

American Robin                 OPCRK    5/5/11 8:37 AM     38.09166 -81.06357

Spotted Sandpiper              NEWRVR   5/6/11 9:44 AM     38.06510 -81.07757

Black-throated Sparrow         OPCRK    5/5/11 12:33 PM    38.09166 -81.06357

Savannah Sparrow               SGRCRK   5/7/11 4:26 PM     38.15658 -81.08332

Song Sparrow                   NEWRVR   5/6/11 10:53 AM    38.06510 -81.07757

European Starling              NEWRVR   5/6/11 2:31 PM     38.06510 -81.07757

Barn Swallow                   OPCRK    5/5/11 10:26 AM    38.09166 -81.06357

Northern Rough-winged Swallow  NEWRVR   5/6/11 8:26 AM     38.06510 -81.07757

Tree Swallow                   NEWRVR   5/6/11 10:02 AM    38.06510 -81.07757

Mute Swan                      NEWRVR   5/6/11 4:27 PM     38.06510 -81.07757

Chimney Swift                  SGRCRK   5/7/11 3:02 PM     38.15658 -81.08332

Scarlet Tanager                OPCRK    5/5/11 8:44 AM     38.09166 -81.06357

Wood Thrush                    OPCRK    5/5/11 9:55 AM     38.09166 -81.06357

Tufted Titmouse                OPCRK    5/5/11 5:41 PM     38.09166 -81.06357

Wild Turkey                    SGRCRK   5/7/11 2:14 PM     38.15658 -81.08332

Red-eyed Vireo                 NEWRVR   5/6/11 8:27 AM     38.06510 -81.07757

Yellow-throated Vireo          SGRCRK   5/7/11 11:10 AM    38.15658 -81.08332

Turkey Vulture                 NEWRVR   5/5/11 5:22 PM     38.06510 -81.07757

Black-and-white Warbler        OPCRK    5/5/11 6:55 AM     38.09166 -81.06357

Blue-winged Warbler            SGRCRK   5/7/11 10:40 AM    38.15658 -81.08332

Cerulean Warbler               SGRCRK   5/7/11 8:34 AM     38.15658 -81.08332

Hooded Warbler                 OPCRK    5/5/11 7:25 AM     38.09166 -81.06357

Kentucky Warbler               SGRCRK   5/7/11 10:04 AM    38.15658 -81.08332

Swainson’s Warbler             SGRCRK   5/7/11 1:18 PM     38.15658 -81.08332

Worm-eating Warbler         NEWRVR   5/6/11 9:28 AM     38.06510 -81.07757

Yellow Warbler                 SGRCRK   5/7/11 3:01 PM     38.15658 -81.08332

Yellow-throated Warbler     NEWRVR   5/6/11 9:28 AM     38.06510 -81.07757

Pileated Woodpecker            SGRCRK   5/7/11 8:35 AM     38.15658 -81.08332

Red-bellied Woodpecker         OPCRK    5/5/11 9:33 AM     38.09166 -81.06357

Carolina Wren               SGRCRK   5/7/11 2:17 PM     38.15658 -81.08332

*****

We’re going again next year. Why don’t you dust off your binocs and join us? 🙂

 

16 thoughts on “Sightings List”

    1. Joan, you would probably love this event. It would be a great way to kick-start your Spring next year. (not-so-subliminal message) 🙂

  1. Actually, I passed on the cup of coffee and I’m printing the list instead. We have had some unusual guests at our bird feeders lately. They stop in, enjoy a nice meal, then disappear.

    Migration to the north was something I hadn’t considered, (duh…) but a likely expanation. Your list is not boring! : )

    1. This past week at Magee Marsh (not too far from you) was a major birding event in the US. Peak migration week in your neck of the woods!

  2. Hmmm… I’m so bird brain challenged. All I can tell you is that the blue jays steal all the food from the feeders and leave the chickadees very little.
    Your list is impressive!

    1. At least you’re not a bird brain yourself! LOL

      Yeah, the Blue Jays are aggressive, and they are obnoxiously loud, but they are very pretty birds.

  3. Sounds like a very successful and fun trip. I would enjoy it even though I don’t know much at all about birds. I love all animals! happy Birthday :)))

  4. This is something I’ve been wanting to do for a while, but haven’t. I’m so happy that you are enjoying your birding trips! I’ve been seeing a lot of beautiful yellow, joyful singing meadowlarks lately – which is appropriate as I live in a community called “Meadowlark Ranch.”

    1. I have not yet seen my FOY (first-of-year in bird-geek) Meadowlark yet. I’ll have to do a little search to see why they would congregate in a certain place, like your neighborhood.

  5. I am so jealous!!!! WOW! How do you know what they are? Do you carry a field book? I bet you saw my birds and have them listed and I still don’t know what they are. I saw a red winged black bird last week and my daughter and I nearly jumped for joy. They are probably common “pests” to others, but we rarely see them and I think they are amazingly beautiful. The crows have taken over our area which is frustrating… they get in to the nests of other birds to eat the young. But the bald eagles come by once every few months and we all run outside screaming!

    1. Katherine, you are so into it!! 🙂

      Have you thought of joining your local Audubon group and going out with them on some local birding outings. It sounds like you and your daughter would really like it!

Leave a comment :-)

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.